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#1 snemelk

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 02:13 PM

I'm not sure if somebody has already posted about this type of scam here...

Virus phone scam being run from call centres in India

The scam always starts the same way: the phone rings at someone's home, and the caller – usually with an Indian accent – asks for the householder, quoting their name and address before saying "I'm calling for Microsoft. We've had a report from your internet service provider of serious virus problems from your computer."


Warning over anti-virus software

Gangsters are tricking worried internet users into buying anti-virus protection that is actually malicious software in disguise, security experts have warned.
(...)
They said criminals pose as legitimate IT companies who cold call victims offering fake security software that can be downloaded for around £30.


Additional info:
- Support Scams: This Time It’s Personal
- Fake Support: the War Drags On
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#2 snemelk

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 02:18 PM

A follow up...

Watch out for 'Microsoft Tech Support' scams

You think you're on the receiving end of a Microsoft Tech Support scam phone call?

If you aren't sure whether you're being conned, ask the person on the other end of the line for your Microsoft Support Case tracking number — every MS tech support interaction has a tracking number or Support ID. Then ask for a phone number and offer to call your caller back. Con artists won't leave trails.

(...)

If you've already been conned — you've given out personal information or a credit-card number — start by contacting your bank or the credit-card issuing company and follow the identity-theft reporting procedures.


And a topic on BleepingComputer: Scam warning: Microsoft support calls you??

I am posting this warning to prevent anyone from falling for this scam.

First and foremost, Microsoft does NOT call random software users with support, unless, you have contacted them first!


EDIT:
Scammed pensioner told heavy rain caused computer virus infection

An Australian newspaper reports that a 93-year-old woman has been scammed by criminals who rang her up, pretending to be Microsoft, and told her that she had a virus infection on her computer.

(...)

According to the media reports:

Mrs Hamblin was told recent heavy rain and storms had caused more computer viruses to circulate.

Yes, you read that right.


Edited by snemelk, 08 February 2011 - 01:23 PM.

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#3 snemelk

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 01:53 PM

And for some time on Skype as well...

Doctor Who calling–on Skype, with malware

Earlier this week, I received a phone call via Skype on my laptop, the caller’s ID was “dralerthelpzc8” as in Dr Alert Help ZC8. The voice on the other end was automated, computerized and otherwise non-human, and alerted me that I had a virus that affects Windows Vista, Windows XP and Windows 7 and that I needed to visit a website to download an update. (This is somewhat similar to the situation where a live person calls and purports to being a Microsoft employee and wants to help you clean your computer. We want to point out that no Microsoft employee would ever call you in an unsolicited manner.)



Edit:
Worrying call from Skype ? - Skype Community forum...

Edited by snemelk, 23 April 2011 - 01:25 PM.

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#4 snemelk

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 01:18 PM

Automated Skype calls spread fake anti-virus warning [VIDEO] (including video)

One of the schemes we have heard of involves unsolicited calls via Skype, where an automated message (what I like to call a "Digital Dorothy") warns you in a semi-robotic voice that your computer's security is not up-to-date.

(...)

"Attention: this is an automated computer system alert. Your computer protection service is not active. To activate computer protection, and repair your computer, go to [LINK]"


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#5 snemelk

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 05:55 PM

An older link but worth posting: Support-Scammer Tricks (Eset Blog)

+ PC Support Scam Resources by David Harley (Eset)
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#6 snemelk

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 01:41 PM

Grinler on BleepingComputer.com: Beware of phone telephone scammers calling on behalf of Google

A new phone scam is underway where people are receiving phone calls by people who state that they calling on behalf of Google.

(...)

If you agree to this evaluation, they will have you download TeamViewer and will then use it to take remote control of your computer. They will then proceed to poke around your computer, look at event viewer, and check your programs. While doing this they will point out "serious" and "alarming" problems on your computer. When they are done scaring you, they go in for the kill by trying to sell you a one-time fix, for $100, or a maintenance contract for $199.

(...)

With this said, beware of any phone calls from people who state that they are calling on behalf of large companies like Microsoft and Google. Microsoft and Google will not call you to offer free phone support or to tell you that your computer is infected. If we receive these calls, promptly hang up and report it to the FCC or other government authority.


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#7 snemelk

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 03:55 PM

The Tech-Support Phone Call Scam (PDF file) - in the Security Awareness Newsletter

You receive a phone call from a person claiming to be from a computer support company associated with Microsoft or another legitimate company. They claim to have detected your computer behaving abnormally, such as scanning the Internet, and believe it is infected with a virus. They explain they are investigating the issue and offer to help you secure your computer. They then use a variety of technical terms and take you through confusing steps to convince you that your computer is infected, scaring you into ultimately buying their product.


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#8 snemelk

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 03:23 PM

Link: Tech Support Phone Scams Surge (Krebs on Security)

These telemarketing scams are nothing new, of course, but they seem to come and go in waves, and right now it’s definitely high tide.

(...)

J.C. said it appears as though these call services are targeting the elderly and people who may have computers but little expertise about how to secure them. KrebsOnSecurity reader and security professional Sam Sharp is fairly convinced of that as well: He wrote in this week to tell me about a similar scam that targeted his mom.


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#9 snemelk

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:10 PM

Another good one: Trying to unmask the fake Microsoft support scammers! (SecureList Blog)

...they told me that the only solution for this is to activate my system and also to install security software which will protect me against viruses, malware, Trojans, hackers and other things. She asked me on the phone If this is what I wanted to do, and said that if I do want this the operator would fix my computer and also install this software. She said this would only cost me about $250 USD.

(...)

They are stealing alot of money from innocent people. I know that people have been warned about these scams, but my conclusion is that they are still calling people because they are still making money out of these scams.


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#10 AplusWebMaster

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 04:52 PM

FYI...

FTC halts massive Tech Support Scams
- http://ftc.gov/opa/2012/10/pecon.shtm
10/03/2012 - "The Federal Trade Commission has launched a major international crackdown on tech support scams in which telemarketers masquerade as major computer companies, con consumers into believing that their computers are riddled with viruses, spyware and other malware, and then charge hundreds of dollars to remotely access and “fix” the consumers’ computers. At the request of the FTC, a U.S. District Court Judge has ordered a halt to six alleged tech support scams pending further hearings, and has frozen their assets... The FTC charged that the operations – mostly based in India – target English-speaking consumers in the United States, Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, and the U.K. According to the FTC, five of the six used telemarketing boiler rooms to call consumers. The sixth lured consumers by placing ads with Google which appeared when consumers searched for their computer company’s tech support telephone number. According to the FTC, after getting the consumers on the phone, the telemarketers allegedly claimed they were affiliated with legitimate companies, including Dell, Microsoft, McAfee, and Norton, and told consumers they had detected malware that posed an imminent threat to their computers. To demonstrate the need for immediate help, the scammers directed consumers to a utility area of their computer and falsely claimed that it demonstrated that the computer was infected. The scammers then offered to rid the computer of malware for fees ranging from $49 to $450. When consumers agreed to pay the fee for fixing the “problems,” the telemarketers directed them to a website to enter a code or download a software program that allowed the scammers remote access to the consumers’ computers. Once the telemarketers took control of the consumers’ computers, they “removed” the non-existent malware and downloaded otherwise free programs... FTC papers filed with the court alleged that the scammers hoped to avoid detection by consumers and law enforcers by using virtual offices that were actually just mail-forwarding facilities, and by using 80 different domain names and 130 different phone numbers. The FTC charged the defendants with violating the FTC Act, which bars unfair and deceptive commercial practices, as well as the Telemarketing Sales Rule and with illegally calling numbers on the Do Not Call Registry. It asked the court to permanently halt the scams and order restitution for consumers... The FTC cases targeted 14 corporate defendants and 17 individual defendants in 6 legal filings, Pecon Software Ltd., Finmaestros LLC, Zeal IT Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Virtual PC Solutions, Lakshmi Infosoul Services Pvt. Ltd., and PCCare247, Inc., and individual defendants in each of the cases..."

- http://www.theregist...t_scam_crushed/
Oct 4, 2012

- http://www.crtc.gc.c...012/r121003.htm
Oct 3, 2012

- http://www.acma.gov....RD/pc=PC_600055
Oct 4, 2012

Posted Image Posted Image

Edited by AplusWebMaster, 14 December 2012 - 05:14 PM.

This machine has no brain.
 ......... Use your own.
Browser check for updates here.
YOU need to defend against -all- vulnerabilities.
Hacks only need to find -1- to get in...
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#11 snemelk

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 01:24 PM

Link: What happens if you play along with a Microsoft 'tech support' scam?

A senior security researcher from Malwarebytes has played along with a Microsoft technical support scammer, documenting the whole episode in a video, to showcase the social engineering that takes place.

(...)

At this point a male "technician" takes over to get Segura to register for a warranty renewal that will cost "only" $299 (£195). It's a complete one off payment for the whole lifetime of the computer. An absolute bargain.

(...)

Segura purposefully enters in wrong banking details knowing it will be rejected.

At this point the scammer gets spiteful, takes control of Segura's computer and deletes all of the documents from his computer. The scammer then looks for more ways to corrupt the system, heading to device manager to delete the Ethernet adapter driver. Before deleting, he posts "bye asshole" (sic) in the TeamViewer chat log.


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#12 AplusWebMaster

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 07:12 AM

FYI...

Bogus Tech Support scams settle FTC charges...
- http://www.ftc.gov/o...echsupport.shtm
May 17, 2013 - "Two operators of alleged tech support scams have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission complaints and give up their ill-gotten gains. Mikael Marczak, doing business as Virtual PC Solutions, and Sanjay Agarwalla were among the subjects of a series of six complaints filed by the FTC last September as part of the Commission’s ongoing efforts to protect consumers from online scams. According to the complaints, the defendants posed as major computer security and manufacturing companies to deceive consumers into believing that their computers were riddled with viruses, spyware and other malware. The complaints alleged that the defendants were -not- actually affiliated with major computer security or manufacturing companies and they had -not- detected viruses, spyware or other security or performance issues on the consumers’ computers. The defendants charged consumers hundreds of dollars to remotely access and “fix” the consumers’ computers... The stipulated final orders against Agarwalla and Marczak and Conquest Audit, prohibit Agarwalla and Marczak from advertising, marketing, promoting, offering for sale or selling any computer security or computer related technical support service and from assisting others in doing so. Marczak and Conquest Audit also are prohibited from marketing or selling debt relief services. In addition, both stipulated final orders impose monetary judgments. The final order against Agarwalla requires him to pay $3,000 – the total amount of funds he received for his role in the alleged scam operation. The final order against Marczak and Conquest Audit includes a $984,721 judgment, which is the total amount of money lost by consumers in the scams..."
 

:ph34r: :ph34r:


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#13 snemelk

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 03:42 PM

Link: Tech Support Scams: Coming to a Mac near you | Malwarebytes Unpacked

In most cases, if you said you were running a Mac instead of Windows, the scammers would hang up and move on to the next victim.

This might change soon.
We came across a company called Speak Support that advertised its Mac technical support on Bing...
(...)
We decided to pick up the phone to see what level of service they did provide...



Plus:
Tech Support Scams - Help & Resource Page | Malwarebytes Unpacked

While remote tech support has its place, there are way too many companies that abuse it. For this reason, we have decided to create a resource page with all the information you need to make a decision before going ahead and giving your credit card information away.
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#14 snemelk

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 04:43 PM

Link: Scammers Pose as Anti-Virus, Go Figure | Malwarebytes Unpacked

In the past, we have mainly seen these types of scammers pretending to be from Microsoft and Detecting Malicious Activity on your system. Of course they end up showing you bogus data and/or connecting to your system remotely in order to make the user believe that they need to pay serious cash in order to fix their problems.

This scam lends an air of legitimacy by claiming to provide support under TechBuddy, AVGs legitimate customer support service.

Since knowledge about Microsoft scammers has become so well-known and documented, it seems logical that they would take a different approach to stealing money.

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#15 snemelk

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 04:31 PM

Link: Tech support scammers spam YouTube with robot-like warnings (Malwarebytes Unpacked)

In a twisted new variant, crooks are calling out to all antivirus / anti-malware customers and urging them to fix their computers now.

One such account was spamming YouTube with hundreds of videos, all using a computer-generated voice and personalized for each AV/Anti-Malware company.

Time to pick up the phone and expose those crooks.

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#16 snemelk

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 04:58 PM

Link: Tech support scammers target smartphone and tablet users (Malwarebytes Unpacked)

Now, those same crooks are going after smart phone and tablet users.
Companies involved in these scams can use one of two methods (or both) to reach out to potential victims: cold calling and/or online advertising.


(...)

Interestingly enough, the tech support technician told me that he would not be able to directly connect to our phone and that I had to plug it into a computer (laptop or desktop) first.

(...)

In this case the bill was $299 for one year of so-called support. Not only is it a lot of money, keep in mind that those miscreants have direct access to your computer and data with all the risks that this entails.

I can imagine that in a near future those fake support companies will remotely access the phone or tablet directly because more and more people no longer own a traditional computer.

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#17 snemelk

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 03:29 PM

Link: Dont fall for tech support scammers offering costly PC cleanup 'solutions'

What can you do to protect yourself? To start, check out our Web article on how to avoid tech support phone scams. (My personal favorite is simple: Just hang up the phone.) Second, report it. Tell the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) or the anti-fraud organization for your country. Weve got a few links below to get you started:

- The Microsoft Safety & Security Center is a hub of information and resources dedicated to helping keep your PC safe from threats, including viruses, malware and phishing attempts.
- The FTC Phone Scam webpage has a phone scam reporting hotline and useful advice on what to look out for when receiving unsolicited phone calls.
- In Canada, the Anti-Fraud Centre can provide support.
- In the U.K., you can report fraud as well as cold calls.

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#18 antiscammer1

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 07:32 PM

Beware EPC Assistant- (hxxp://www.epcassistant.com) a Scam Company run by an Indian
 
One of my best friends got scammed by this company named EPC 
 
Assistant (hxxp://www.epcassistant).They called him and said that his Email is hacked and 
 
it's shooting spam to many people and he asked him to give the 
 
remote control of his computer to demostrate the issue and  he 
 
ran this tree command on the command prompt and at the end of 
 
the result it showed him 102 viruas found and showed a 
 
different command where it showed him one foreign IP and he did 
 
not realise that it was the foreign ip address of the same 
 
techsupport guy.And he was thinking why the computer misspelled 
 
virus.The caller then asked him to pay $800 and buy their 
 
subscription.My friend actually hung up on him and then we 
 
called the no back and some one answered thanks for calling Max 
 
pc care so I looked for the number on internet and got to know 
 
that the Max pc care is a scam company running in India.So they 
 
are running a scam company with two different name.their 
 
contact numbers are EpcAssistant (1-855-811-5316) and Max Pc
 
care (1-855-763-0457) and they call themselve as microsoft 
 
certified technician.
 
Its a scam do not call 1-855-763-0457 or 1-855-811-5316 or 1-
 
855-763-0462. They use the tree command and event viewer to 
 
fool you.At tree command they quickly type the error message 
 
themselves which you see and get worried to buy there plan.

Edited by TheJoker, 08 May 2014 - 08:37 PM.
Links removed


#19 snemelk

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 04:03 PM

Link: Google and Facebook join forces to take down fake tech support scammers

Web giants Google and Facebook have announced that they recently took down 4,000 suspicious advertiser accounts linked to more than 2,400 tech support websites.

The move to crack down on tech support scams comes with the announcement that Google and Facebook have joined forces, along with with AOL, Twitter and Yahoo, to raise awareness of malicious advertising.

The coalition's new website, TrustInAds.org, offers tools to report bad ads to the coalition member companies, and its associated trend report offers an interesting look inside Google and Facebook's investigation of the crooks behind phony tech support ads.

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#20 snemelk

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 12:16 PM

This one is quite funny, a scammer called the wrong guy, again...

Link: What Happens When a Tech Support Scammer Cold Calls Emsisoft?
 

Its called the Microsoft Tech Support scam, and its been around for years. Last week, Emsisoft and Bleeping Computer intercepted one of these scammers, and in addition to messing with him for a good three hours, we took detailed notes on how the Microsoft Tech Support scam works.

(...)

MRZ-PC (8:38 PM):

now let me go ahead n scan the brain f brain f your computer n let seee wat it says , if u hav any iother any problm tis scan will tell us

ok

i will tell u


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