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#1 mr bones

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Posted 31 May 2004 - 02:26 PM

http://maxcomputing....me.html?lang=en

System Safety Monitor (SSM) is an application-firewalling tool (it is not a "firewall" in traditional understanding, so there shouldn't be any conflicts with your network firewalls). SSM controls which programs are running on your computer and what they are doing. For example, SSM can prevent so called "DLL Injection". Also, SSM will notify you whenever a program you want to start was modified. In addition, SSM can constantly check your registry and alert you, when an important modification was made.



#2 WyoCowboy

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 12:24 PM

This looks like a useful little program, after downloading it from what appears to be the slowest ftp server in the world (Russia?). The one feature that makes it worth my while is that it shows you the dlls that are running under each instance of svchhost.exe - great for chasing down viruses and scumware.

#3 lonewolf

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 04:44 AM

I have been using SSM for quite a while now, and would say it is well worth the download. One of the best FREE programs around. Works great with any firewall, like Zonealarm, Sygate, NPF and others. The application firewall feature (or sandbox) is most useful in controlling any programs you may not want starting on your computer, including malware. I'm pretty sure this is a faster download location for the program. http://www.snapfiles...stemsafety.html


Here's a few other similar FREE programs.

1. Regprot http://www.diamondcs...hp?page=regprot

2. Winsonar 2004 http://www.snapfiles...t/winsonar.html

Also remember Spybots 'Teatimer' will monitor some parts of registry for changes as well.

Edited by lonewolf, 22 July 2004 - 05:04 AM.


#4 23Antz

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 12:23 PM

Programs that guard the registry sound like a great idea, but what about people like me who barely have any concept of how little they actually know? If I were to use RegistryProt (for ex) would it be safe to simply allow no changes to the registry unless I happen to know a particular change is the result of something I want to do?

I was just looking at the RegistryProt page, and all these example dialogs that pop up, and just off the top of my head I wouldn't know whether to reply with Yes, No, or Cancel! :weee:

#5 Charlesvar

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 03:24 PM

Programs that guard the registry sound like a great idea, but what about people like me who barely have any concept of how little they actually know? If I were to use RegistryProt (for ex) would it be safe to simply allow no changes to the registry unless I happen to know a particular change is the result of something I want to do?

Generally speaking, yes.

If you're on the net surfing and all of sudden something wants to write to the registry, it doesn't take "knowlege" to really look at what wants the change and if not sure, deny it. If it really is legitimate and something stops working (rare), it will ask again, having given you a chance for thought and research.

Most of the time, resident software wants to write to the registry, certainly from an install for example. One other reason would be if software wants to add itself to the startup folder(s). You have a chance to first know about it and second to permit/deny.

Like w/ everything else, with practice and familiarity, you get better at it.

I am an SSM user.

Regards - Charles

#6 Paranoid

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Posted 23 July 2004 - 11:44 AM

I agree that SSM is too difficult for a newbie if he uses the application monitoring function, that will typically lead to a blizzard of popups.
Since there are lots and lots of processes starting each other off, espically when installing prograns

The registry monitoring function is much easier and almost exactly like registryprot except more keys are covered. Any process that autostarts on your computer should be familar to you , or should be anyway if you want to remain secure., so it shouldn't be too hard.

So you can use SSM, just don't select "watch app activity" but select "enable plugins"(for registry monitoring)
Please note that the software I recommend above is entirely based on only my own experience and testing. In no way should my comments,opinions and endorsements be construed as an endorsement by the forum, nor do they reflect the advise or recommendations by the experts or helpers at spywareinfo.


#7 Charlesvar

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Posted 23 July 2004 - 12:06 PM

I agree that SSM is too difficult for a newbie if he uses the application monitoring function, that will typically lead to a blizzard of popups.

Paranoid, don't agree with you on the app question.

1st, if too difficult then why bother w/ SSM - use script sentry.

2nd, would you tell someone using a firewall that monitoring app activity is too difficult? I think not. So if someone uses SSM, they should take the time and trouble of learning what's on their system, if unwilling, don't use it.

Besides which, everyone starts out as a "newbie", even me & you :D So the difference is one of attitude about learning.

Regards - Charles

EDIT: Like in a firewall, the "bliizzard" of popupd is an initial condition. As the user permits/denies, it will settle down.

Edited by Charlesvar, 23 July 2004 - 12:15 PM.


#8 Paranoid

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Posted 24 July 2004 - 11:22 AM

.
Regards - Charles

EDIT: Like in a firewall, the "bliizzard" of popupd is an initial condition. As the user permits/denies, it will settle down.

Paranoid, don't agree with you on the app question.


Not sure what you are disagreeing about, since you do apparantly agree that some people lack the interest, or time to learn how to use application monitoring/sandboxes.

1st, if too difficult then why bother w/ SSM - use script sentry.


Because SSM and script sentry are totally different?

2nd, would you tell someone using a firewall that monitoring app activity is too difficult? I think not


Not sure what point you are making. But I believe there is a big difference between a sophiscated application monitoring sandbox and a firewall like ZA free for example.

Another point is that a simple basic firewall I believe is worth the time and effort to learn, while something like SSM is a extra.


. So if someone uses SSM, they should take the time and trouble of learning what's on their system, if unwilling, don't use it


Exactly, and I'm telling you many people like Antz123 apparantly don't want to take the time. I don't think it's anything to be ashamed above. Live is short, and there are more important things in life.


Besides which, everyone starts out as a "newbie", even me & you  :D  So the difference is one of attitude about learning.


Apparantly I'm still a newbie unlike you, since I still find SSM a pain to use after months of use.
Please note that the software I recommend above is entirely based on only my own experience and testing. In no way should my comments,opinions and endorsements be construed as an endorsement by the forum, nor do they reflect the advise or recommendations by the experts or helpers at spywareinfo.





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