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A Smartphone Charger That Sniffs for Malware


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#1 Android 8888

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 04:58 AM

Here is a very interesting new technology, which could be relevant in malware fighting, concerning to the smartphones...

 

The Skorpion is a charger that promises to analyze and identify malware smartphone while recharging the battery.

 

Source: MIT Technology Review


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#2 The Dark Knight

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 05:24 AM

Seems like it could have some potential. I am not overly familiar with smartphone malware but as there are so many accessories and different types of chargers etc it doesn't come as a surprise that people would try to infect you through those means.

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#3 Android 8888

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:37 PM

It is not through the charger that the smartphone is infected. The smartphone is infected in the same way through the data transmission normally from the infected apps. The charger will provide antivirus and the great advantage according to the company is that it is physically separated from the smartphone with no chance of infection, since there is no data transmission between the charger and the smartphone. The charger will only scan the smartphone searching for infections. This is my understanding of what I read in the article...


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#4 snemelk

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 02:27 PM

It is not through the charger that the smartphone is infected.

You sure?

- Public Charging Stations Could Steal iPhone Data
- Researchers reveal how to hack an iPhone in 60 seconds

:)
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#5 Android 8888

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 07:35 AM

This surprises me snemelk. It is about public charging stations but the MIT article is not very clear about it. Do these stations have great demand? It seems that you must enter a passcode after plug in the phone to allow a sign-code attack. What kind of passcode is this? Is it related with the phone standard passcode or is it needed when plug in the charger?

 

As I read in the end of the article from your first link, I think it is better to rely with our own charging equipment...  :think:


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#6 snemelk

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:19 PM

It means a standard passcode:

From the 2nd link: "The researchers said that all the user needs to do to start the attack is enter their passcode - they pointed out that this is a pattern of ordinary use, such as to check a message while the phone is charging."

As I read in the end of the article from your first link, I think it is better to rely with our own charging equipment...  :think:

For example solar-powered! :lol:

Do public charging stations have a great demand? I'm not sure, but there are certain places where they're common - for example on airports...
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