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C D Drives how to use them

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#1 spyz1

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Posted 05 February 2016 - 08:02 PM

I hope this is the correct place to post this topic. If not please advise.

 

Using W7 home premium.  500 gb HDD

 

So, I have a Laptop with a    C  and D  drive. Came that way.  It was divided  C - 250GB  and  D - 250GB

 

I understand that C is for OS and programs. D drive is labelled DATA.

 

So far all my programs and files and data seems to be on C  (only 50gb left free) plus the OS.   D is almost empty apart form a few very small files.

 

My question is this:

 

Some say that D should be kept entirely free for rescuing the OS and data  if C goes down.

 

Some say that only a small amount of D would be needed to restore so use D for storing files music videos etc.  And if possible store everything on  D except the OS and programs then C would be relatively  free and the OS on C would work much faster.

 

This question has arose because prior  to dual loading Linux onto THE hard drive (preferably not alongside but as a separate partition),  I want to sort out where everything is before loading Linux. So ideally, Drive C and D on partition 1, Linux on Partition 2,   3 and 4  swap and boot (or something similar)



#2 Budfred

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Posted 05 February 2016 - 10:48 PM

First - 50 gigs is a lot of room, especially for Linux...  Second, it is likely that C and D are on the same physical drive and that they are simply two partitions already...  Third, it is likely that your OS for reinstall is on a small hidden partition and doesn't use the space you are directly aware of...  It would be a good idea to take a look at what is on the computer without Windows interfering...  This can be done by booting some program before Windows loads and reading what is on the computer from that...  There are Linux installs that will let you do that and various other programs as well...  I use a disk rescue program from System Suite that lets me see what is actually on the drive...  If you have a hidden partition, it is likely that your Windows OS backup is there...  If you don't have it, make a set of disks that have it and keep them safe...  You can make them through Windows, although in some cases you will need to contact them to be able to...  It is unlikely that your D drive would be helpful if you need to rescue the OS, especially since if it is the same physical drive as C - if one drive fails, the other will too...

 

If you wish to make a dual boot with Linux, I suggest that you would probably be best served by making a copy of everything on the drives that exists to an external drive, reformatting your 500 G drive and then partitioning either two drives using 400 G and a third one using 100 G (for Linux) or making two drives of 400 G and 100 G (for Linux)...  Either way, I suggest limiting the Linux drive to about 100 G of the total - possibly even less...  Another option would be to load Linux on a large flash drive and boot from there so that you don't need to use your hard drive at all... 

 

If you wish to load Linux, it would need to be on a separate partition - it would not work to load it on the same partition as Windows...  If Windows is already loaded, reformatting part of your main drive is much more difficult and that is why you are better off backing up your drive(s) to an external drive and then reformatting so that you can partition a Windows drive and then use Linux to create a Linux drive...  Both would be on the same physical drive, but would be formatted with two different operating systems... 

 

As for keeping D clear - it isn't necessary unless you want to make the entire thing a Linux drive...  On my computers, I put programs which are essential and need to load quickly onto my C drive (which is a SSD drive that loads very quickly) and put almost everything else on other drives...  This is desktop computer, so I am talking about separate physical drives, so the situation is a bit different from yours... 

 

So again, first thing to do is to find out more clearly what you actually have in your computer...


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#3 spyz1

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 10:10 AM

Thanks

 

Can you explain what you mean by formatting and reformatting exactly?

 

Assuming I load Linux alongside windows Would it (first before loading Linux)  be worthwhile me putting all my programs and applications on C and files etc on D. So that I can load quickly for the reasons you explain. I feel that my Laptop is very slow probably because it has for some reason it decided to load everything onto C  (the drive that loads first in implementing programs?) and leave D virtually clear.

 

Also assuming we have a Windows Linux dual loading machine, do I envisage Windows C and D on partition 1, Linux Minit Partition 2, Boot loaders for both windows and Linux in the hidden partition. I believe the windows always has this on the left if looking at partitions on Gparted screen.

 

I am using a live usb Mint version 17.3 . This will be the version I will install.

 

Mint allows dual loading from the live USB.

Mint allows you  a choice  either install 'along side'  windows or do 'something else' when going through the install on mint. I think the 'something else' means clearing Windows 7 off completely.

 

I have made a screenshot of gparted results showing what is on my hard drive. I cannot figure how to upload this here or delete any erroneous post I make?  I have read the 'how to post' instructions but cannot see it. I also cannot figure how to use quote.


Edited by spyz1, 08 February 2016 - 10:32 AM.


#4 Budfred

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 11:38 AM

To use "Quote" you can simply click on the Quote button to quote the previous post (usually unnecessary) or you can use the Quote tool from the tool bar just above this top line in the Reply window...  The Quote tool looks like a thought bubble...  If you hover your mouse over each tool, it will show you what it is...  You can highlight text and then press that icon or you can paste text into it once you have created it...  Make sure you have "full editing" turned on to use it...  The full editing can be turned off or on with the button on the far top left of the Reply window...  You would also use these tools to upload a screenshot - keeping in mind that we don't allow jpegs...

 

What I mean by formatting is to set the drive up for an install by preparing it...  Drives are formatted to accommodate the type of OS you are using...  So if you have 32bit Windows, you would typically format it with NTFS 32bit...  I am not sure what Linux would require for formatting, but that is usually part of the install process...  If you are not familiar with formatting and re-partitioning, you may be getting into a difficult situation setting up a dual boot with Linux...  Here is a Windows page on formatting:  http://windows.micro...isks-and-drives

 

I am not sure what you are saying about having programs loaded in C making your laptop run slower...  Windows generally loads to C by default and it would generally not slow down your laptop at all to have everything loaded in C...  It is much more likely that you have malware slowing it down...  You may want to post logs in Malware Removal after reading the Instructions: http://www.spywarein...showtopic=79038

 

What I was suggesting is that you either use the D drive for you Linux install after clearing it of Windows and formatting it for Linux or that you re-partition your hard drive to put all Windows material on 400 G and leave 100 G for Linux...  Since you have a USB version of Linux, the third (and probably easiest) option would be to run Linux from the USB and don't bother with the dual boot thing...  You would just set your BIOS to boot from the USB first and, if you don't have the USB installed, it will go on to the Windows install...  I don't know what "along side Windows" means...  Generally you would have a separate partition for Linux and it would be formatted for Linux, so it would not be on the same partition as Windows...  It would look as though it is on a completely different hard drive even though it would actually be a partition on the single physical hard drive...  Again, it is easier to boot from the USB rather than setting up another partition...  If you are using something like a 128 G USB drive, you will have plenty of room to run Linux and store tons of Linux files...


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#5 spyz1

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 02:05 PM

Thanks but I have tried highlighting passages of your previous post and pressing quote button. However, the whole post is quoted in the reply box not the highlighted section?
 
I have full editor switched on.
 
Cannot see anything to upload screenshot except 'image' which links to a URL finder?
 
Regarding dual loading alongside windows. 
 
 Quote - 'It would look as though it is on a completely different hard drive even though it would actually be a partition on the single physical hard drive'
 
I think that is what Mint does - it should create a separate partition for itself alongside Windows on the hardrive (Where C and D currently are). My only worry was that if I delete everything on D or the D partition then windows cannot create backup files which I understood it does somewhere (on D or a hidden partition)
 
Quote:  - 'I am not sure what you are saying about having programs loaded in C making your laptop run slower...  Windows generally loads to C by default and it would generally not slow down your laptop at all to have everything loaded in C...  It is much more likely that you have malware slowing it down...  You may want to post logs in Malware Removal after reading the Instructions'
 
Somewhere I have read that C and boot loads quicker as it is near the core of the drive? May have that completely wrong. That is why Windows always put boot on left of partition?
 
I have checked for Malware consistently using  ESET and MWB. Over months/ years Windows has become slower no matter what. I have even read that typically Intel processors strangle speed if too many windows are open?
 
That is why I will change to Mint being a much lighter system altogether,  but I would like to keep W7 on the HD as backup. Mint say you can dual load mint and W7 on the same computer HD This can be done from the USB. I eventually want to move Mint  off the Live USB as I want to use it as my main OS. 
 
I also want to be able eventually to access W7 from the file manager in Mint and use Wine to run windows files and programs in Mint.
 
 I would also ideally put all my personal files on a backup off computer  before  resetting W7 back to its original state before co-installing Mint on the same hard drive as above.

Edited by Budfred, 08 February 2016 - 03:38 PM.


#6 Budfred

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 04:03 PM

Thanks but I have tried highlighting passages of your previous post and pressing quote button. However, the whole post is quoted in the reply box not the highlighted section?

 

I have full editor switched on.

 

Cannot see anything to upload screenshot except 'image' which links to a URL finder?

 

Regarding dual loading alongside windows. 

 

 Quote - 'It would look as though it is on a completely different hard drive even though it would actually be a partition on the single physical hard drive'

 

I think that is what Mint does - it should create a separate partition for itself alongside Windows on the hardrive (Where C and D currently are). My only worry was that if I delete everything on D or the D partition then windows cannot create backup files which I understood it does somewhere (on D or a hidden partition)

 

Quote:  - 'I am not sure what you are saying about having programs loaded in C making your laptop run slower...  Windows generally loads to C by default and it would generally not slow down your laptop at all to have everything loaded in C...  It is much more likely that you have malware slowing it down...  You may want to post logs in Malware Removal after reading the Instructions'

 

Somewhere I have read that C and boot loads quicker as it is near the core of the drive? May have that completely wrong. That is why Windows always put boot on left of partition?

 

I have checked for Malware consistently using  ESET and MWB. Over months/ years Windows has become slower no matter what. I have even read that typically Intel processors strangle speed if too many windows are open?

 

That is why I will change to Mint being a much lighter system altogether,  but I would like to keep W7 on the HD as backup. Mint say you can dual load mint and W7 on the same computer HD This can be done from the USB. I eventually want to move Mint  off the Live USB as I want to use it as my main OS. 

 

I also want to be able eventually to access W7 from the file manager in Mint and use Wine to run windows files and programs in Mint.

 

 I would also ideally put all my personal files on a backup off computer  before  resetting W7 back to its original state before co-installing Mint on the same hard drive as above.

 

I used the Quote button to quote your post above (I removed the extra empty lines however...  If I want to quote a particular part of your post, I copy it and then paste it in a quote box from the Quote button on the toolbar:

 

 

Thanks but I have tried highlighting passages of your previous post and pressing quote button. However, the whole post is quoted in the reply box not the highlighted section?

 

You need to copy/paste for specific quotes...  I also edited your post to take out all of the empty space because it makes it harder to read your Reply while I typing mine... 

 

 

Cannot see anything to upload screenshot except 'image' which links to a URL finder?

 

That is how most people will post images - put it on an image hosting site and paste the url into the Image dialogue...  You can also click on More Reply Options and upload an image from there...  The tools for that are below the Reply window... 

 

 

I think that is what Mint does - it should create a separate partition for itself alongside Windows on the hardrive (Where C and D currently are). My only worry was that if I delete everything on D or the D partition then windows cannot create backup files which I understood it does somewhere (on D or a hidden partition)

 

If you create a new smaller partition either by reducing the size of D and using the area you reduced or by starting over with a format/reinstall and leaving a partition to use for Linux, you can avoid any risk of anything being overwritten...  Most of the Windows backups that are done automatically are through System Restore and they would typically be on the C drive...  If you want backups of your data, you usually need to set that up yourself and either put it on the cloud or some other place like an external drive...  If your backups are on your main drive and that drive fails, you will lose your backups...  If you leave things on D and then tell Linux to use that, you will lose whatever you have on D...

 

 

Somewhere I have read that C and boot loads quicker as it is near the core of the drive? May have that completely wrong. That is why Windows always put boot on left of partition?

 

I think you are confused about that...  If your drive is a standard mechanical drive, where the date is on the drive could make some difference, but not within the range that you could tell - it would be nanoseconds...  If it is a SSD drive, it makes no difference at all, but should load very quickly...  I use SSDs as my boot drives for that reason...  Either way, since Windows is the first thing installed in almost all cases, it has the pick of where to be installed on the drive and you don't need to worry about that...  When you say to "put boot on left of partition", I am not sure what you are talking about...  If you are talking about the way it is represented in some graphic, that doesn't really indicate how it is actually coded onto the drive - left and right really don't apply in the 3 dimensions of the drive...  This is especially true if it is a SSD drive... 

 

 

I have checked for Malware consistently using  ESET and MWB. Over months/ years Windows has become slower no matter what. I have even read that typically Intel processors strangle speed if too many windows are open?

 

Speed will decline if too many windows are open, but that is dependent on the speed of your CPU and amount of RAM available...  The more programs that you have to load at boot, the longer it takes to boot...  Once everything is loaded, it usually will run okay, but if too many programs are running in the background, it can slow down your computer...  Do you have ESET and MBAM both running in resident mode so that they are updating and checking all of the time??  If not, it would be a good idea to do that or at least to update and run MBAM every week or so...  Windows generally won't slow down if you keep the computer clean and don't load it with a lot of background stuff...  Do you run a firewall as well??  A firewall, antivirus and anti-malware are the 3 programs that really do need to be running background all of the time... 

 

If you make Linux your primary OS, your system will likely run much faster simply because the load on the system is so much less...  Having it load as a dual boot is feasible and would involve using some of your hard drive as a Linux partition...  The Linux installer will probably set up the dual boot options for you...  I haven't used Wine or Mint, so I can't tell you much about how they will work, but they should be fine if you set it up properly in the first place... 

 

 

I would also ideally put all my personal files on a backup off computer  before  resetting W7 back to its original state before co-installing Mint on the same hard drive as above.

 

Another option would be to clean up your C drive, back it up and move whatever you need to keep on the computer from D to C...  That way you could use the entire D drive to load Linux...  If you can clear another 50 g or so on the C drive, that might be the simplest way to go...  It can be tedious to do the clean up, but it might be easier than the whole reformat/reinstall thing... 


Budfred

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#7 spyz1

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 05:36 PM

Thanks Budfred - A lot to do there. I think I do have a lot of programs (not necessarily running at start up) so maybe a cull is needed. I will take your advice and reduce/clean what is on C and then put Linux where D was. Interesting about speed and SSDs . Sounds like a good option. My ESET and MWB are free options they are manually run regularly but I will run before changing or making a copy of the system. I only want to copy W7 - my data I will store elsewhere. 


Edited by spyz1, 08 February 2016 - 05:37 PM.


#8 Budfred

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 01:37 AM

Thanks Budfred - A lot to do there. I think I do have a lot of programs (not necessarily running at start up) so maybe a cull is needed. I will take your advice and reduce/clean what is on C and then put Linux where D was. Interesting about speed and SSDs . Sounds like a good option. My ESET and MWB are free options they are manually run regularly but I will run before changing or making a copy of the system. I only want to copy W7 - my data I will store elsewhere.

Be sure to update ESET and MBAM before running them...  Do a deep scan since it sounds like you may have a problem...  It is a VERY good idea to run your antivirus in resident mode, so if you don't wish to pay for it, you may want to go with Microsoft Security Essentials...


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