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Avoiding static electric shock!


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#1 oicnow

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 04:39 AM

:p It may be a pain but hang onto a metal part of the door as you exit.

#2 ell

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 05:03 AM

To avoid static shocks, try using a ring or a key to touch something metal before you touch the door handle. Or install a metal grounding plate at the threshold of the door. And please be careful when refueling.

#3 ErikAlbert

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 07:03 AM

ell,
Thanks for the warning. I was recently a victim of several static shocks, but I have to go now.
My shrink and two male nurses want me back in my cell. See you later.
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#4 jedi

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 07:37 AM

Nice to see you back ell, haven't seen you since November. Thanks for the advice.

ErikAlbert - When you turn into a fireball on a garage forecourt, remember, you were warned!!
:D
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#5 dkillk

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 09:55 AM

:excl: After you open the door, reach up and firmly grasp the roof of the car. Then step out. Then let go of the roof and close the door.

Takes a bit of mental discipline, but it works!

On Feb 7, 2005, at 9:44 PM, newsletter@spywareinfo.com wrote:

On a side note, if anyone knows of a way to keep the car from electrocuting me every time I step out of it and touch metal, I would be most appreciative. "Static Guard" spray obviously doesn't work as advertised. I'm surprised I don't have burn marks on my fingers by now.

#6 Groovymarlin

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:09 PM

In the latest newsletter, you wrote:

On a side note, if anyone knows of a way to keep the car from electrocuting me every time I step out of it and touch metal, I would be most appreciative. "Static Guard" spray obviously doesn't work as advertised. I'm surprised I don't have burn marks on my fingers by now.


I had to chuckle at that, sorry. My husband used to have the same problem. I guess some people are just more "staticky" than others. :D

He got into the habit of touching something metal with his car key when he gets out of the car now. So he'll touch the car itself, or a doorframe, or something like that, before touching a doorknob or another person or whatever with his hand. This usually causes an impressive arc of static electricity to be discharged! But because the end of the key that you hold is sheathed in plastic or rubber, he himself is not shocked.

He'll even have his keys out and touch the doorjamb with a key before touching the knob to leave the house. Sometimes I accuse him of static paranoia because he does this so frequently, but at least it helps.

If you can get into the habit of doing something similar, it might help. As far as Static Guard, it won't really help with that kind of static. It does help with static electricity on clothes, and even your hair or your pet (just spray it on a brush and then apply to hair or pet), but not really carpets, car interiors, etc. (in my experience).

Good luck!

#7 ErikAlbert

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:29 PM

Static Statistics : worth to read :ph34r:
http://www.snopes.co...ards/static.asp

Edited by ErikAlbert, 08 February 2005 - 01:37 PM.

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#8 Mr. Swenk

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 02:59 PM

My husband used to have the same problem. I guess some people are just more "staticky" than others.  :D

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Any suggestions from getting shocked when touching a laptop? Sometimes when I touch my laptop I get shocked ( not from the current, but from static electricity )

:wacko:
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#9 Groovymarlin

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 01:34 PM

Any suggestions from getting shocked when touching a laptop? Sometimes when I touch my laptop I get shocked ( not from the current, but from static electricity )

:wacko:

View Post


Ooh, that can't be good for the laptop, huh? Hmm. I think you just want to ground yourself before touching the laptop and setting off the zap. Maybe keep a small screwdriver in your work area and touch something metal with it before you sit down to work. Also I think there's a mousepad you can buy that is anti-static, not sure if that would work for you. And isn't there a wristband that you can get to wear while working inside computers which helps avoid static shock? Maybe you could get that and wear it all the time while working on your laptop.

Here it is: http://www.cdw.com/s...aspx?EDC=091654. I think you put it on and then clip the end to something metal perhaps.

#10 ErikAlbert

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 01:55 PM

Touching a partner or colleague of the opposite gender before you leave the laptop, will convert the static energy into a pleasant energy and you will have a good excuse. :)
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#11 Mr. Swenk

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 02:26 PM

hahah Erik, good one ^_^


Thanks Groovy ^_____^, I've been shocked when I put my hand just next to the hard-drive when it was turned on o.o
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#12 doe55

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Posted 12 February 2005 - 10:14 AM

Try this site. Never used it but looks interesting.

http://www.stopshox.com/index.htm

#13 macaroo

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Posted 12 February 2005 - 10:35 AM

Reminds me of the problem, years ago, when trucks first started to be fitted with plastic bedliners. The loose fit against the painted surface would cause a huge build up of static charge on the surface of the bedliner. People would fill a gas can without removing it from the truck and draw a arc from the nozzle of the hose to the neck of the can. This would ignite the vapors in the can with sometimes catastrophic results.
Always set the can on the ground before refilling it. I once got a shock from my bedliner that rock me on my heels. Never could figure out why the screw that held it in place did not act as a discharge path. Corrosion maybe.

#14 ErikAlbert

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Posted 12 February 2005 - 11:35 AM

What I don't understand is why everybody suddenly starts talking about static electricity, because this is not the only topic at SWI.
Did something happen in the USA ? An accident or something ?
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#15 jedi

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Posted 12 February 2005 - 12:06 PM

Speaking for myself, I seem to get static buildup when I'm stressed about something, so maybe there's a stress problem in the U.S. But I tend to think, as has been said already, that some people are just more prone to it than others. Touching someone else is not necessarily the solution, if they suffer from the same problem there is an audible 'Crack!' and it stings, a lot! Not a good way to meet people.
My solution has always been just to touch something metal as soon as possible and discharge it. Not a good idea in a petrol station though!

Edited by jedi, 12 February 2005 - 12:07 PM.

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#16 Trilobite

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 10:29 AM

...if they suffer from the same problem there is an audible 'Crack!' and it stings, a lot! Not a good way to meet people.

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:D Itís worse when it happens while shaking hands at a job interview. :blush2:

#17 njustice

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 09:05 PM

On a side note, if anyone knows of a way to keep the car from electrocuting me every time I step out of it and touch metal, I would be most appreciative. "Static Guard" spray obviously doesn't work as advertised. I'm surprised I don't have burn marks on my fingers by now.


Speaking from experience all one needs to do is take a 2" wide strip of rubber and attach to the undercarriage of the vehicle so it touches the ground. (length is dependent on height of vehicle).


By the way...thanks for the laughs...I've been there too!!! :D
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#18 ErikAlbert

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 06:15 AM

njustice,
You are right about the rubber strips, I have seen them many times over on the belgian roads.
Thanks to you, I finally know what their purpose is, until then I thought there was something wrong with the undercarriage of the car (a broken wire or something).
That's what you get, when you drive a bicycle and don't know anything about cars. :)
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#19 Guest_TuningForky_*

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 07:26 PM

For the first time in my life, I am experiencing static shocks as a result of exiting my car. Every time, without fail, and painful, I might add. I attribute this to the fact that there are no metal parts to be grounded to-- my car is a virtual casket of "molded plastic."

#20 cwohardy

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Posted 22 April 2005 - 05:00 AM

Keep a dryer sheet in your car. I keep one in the pocket on the door and I rub my hands with it last thing after getting out the car. Works every time! Bounce now has an unscented one if you dont like the smell on your hands.
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